Updating cellphones double your dating catalogue

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For example, my one-and-a-half year old Galaxy S7 is running the same version of Android as the much-newer S8: they’re both running Android Nougat.But that’s also the problem: they’re both running Android Nougat.Even though the S8 is Samsung’s current flagship, it still doesn’t have Android Oreo, which has been available for a few months now.So, while you’re still likely to see the update on a non-Pixel flagship, you’ll likely still be waiting for that to happen.Some are “flagship” phones, with more advanced hardware than the i Phone.All that said, there is a series of Android phones made to directly mimic (and compete with) the i Phone in terms of release cycle and product support: the Pixel line.RELATED: If you’re sick of not getting updates, there’s one very clear path to take: buy a Pixel.These phones are designed, sold, and maintained by Google, so they get updated when the latest versions of Android are available—on time, every time.

New Android users are often disappointed to discover that their shiny new smartphone won’t get any updates—or worse, that it’s running old software the moment they bought it.This has gotten better over time as consumers have pushed for better support as flagship phones get more and more expensive, but we still have a long way to go for manufacturers like Samsung to support their hardware the same way Google does.Lastly, Android smartphone manufacturers are also beholden to cell phone carriers, who can delay updates by months on their networks.RELATED: Android is open source, so it’s possible for Android users to take its source code and roll their own operating systems—known as a custom ROM—for their smartphones.If you have a reasonably popular device, there are likely other Android users out there developing and tweaking custom ROMs for it—Lineage OS is currently a great place to start if you’re looking to get in on some ROM action.

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